Friday, March 15, 2019

How to Train Your Dog

Getting Started With Dog Training Man holding paw of border collie,
elevated view Kane Skennar/Digital Vision/Getty Images Are you ready to start training your dog or puppy?

Proper training and socialization are among your dog's basic needs. It's important to start training your dog as soon as possible. At first, dog training can seem pretty overwhelming,
 especially if this is your first dog. The truth is that training your dog is a very big project. If you take it step by step, you will find the task to be far less daunting. Here is some information to help get you started: Start a Dog Obedience Program: Learn how to set a basic foundation before you begin to train your dog. Positive Reinforcement: There are many different ways to train a dog,
 but most dog professionals agree that the positive way is the best for both the dog and trainer.

 Train Your Dog Using Games: Training your dog should be fun! Everyone knows it's easier to learn when you are having a good time, so try implementing some games into your dog training regimen.

Six Weeks to a Well-Trained Dog: Using this schedule as a guide,
 you can teach your dog the basics in about six weeks. Need help with dog training? Consider getting help from a dog trainer. Try group classes and/or private lessons. 02 of 09 House Training and Crate Training Puppy in Crate - Photo of Dog in Kennel Photo .

Unless you plan to keep your dog outdoors--and few of us do because it's not recommended--you'll need to teach your dog where to eliminate. Therefore, house training (also called housebreaking or potty training) is one of the first things you need to work on with your dog.

 Crate training can be a very helpful part of the training process. This includes house training as well as many other areas of training: Crate Training Dogs and Puppies:
 Here are the basics of training your dog or puppy to accept and even enjoy the crate. Not only will it help with housebreaking, but it will also give your dog a place of his own. How to House Train your Dog: When it comes down to it,
 house training is not that complicated, but this doesn't mean it's easy. Consistency and diligence are key during the housebreaking process. Submissive/Excitement Urination in Dogs:
 If your dog is still having accidents in the house, it may be more than a simple housebreaking issue. Your dog might urinate out of excitement or to express submissive behavior. 03 of 09 Leash Training Dogs and Puppies Sheltie Dog Walking On a Loose Leash - Leash Training Dogs to Walk on Leash Photo

Apple Tree House/Getty Images Every dog needs to learn to walk on a leash. Besides the fact that most areas have leash laws, there will be times when keeping your dog on a leash is for his own safety. Learn how to introduce your dog or puppy to the leash, then teach him how to walk properly on the leash. A loose leash walk teaches your dog not to pull or lunge when on ​the leash, making the experience more enjoyable for both you and your dog.

 04 of 09 How To Socialize Dogs and Puppies Puppy being socialized Robert Daly/Getty Images Socialization means training your puppy or adult dog to accept new people, animals, and various places by exposing him to these things. Socialized dogs are less likely to develop behavior problems and are generally more welcomed by others.

Socialization can also help prevent the development of fears and phobias. The bottom line is that socializing your dog or puppy will make him a happier, more well-behaved dog. 05 of 09 Clicker Training for Dogs Clicker Training Dogs Photo

: Elf/Wikimedia Commons Clicker training,
 a common form of positive reinforcement, is a simple and effective dog training method. Although it is still fine to train your dog without clicker training, many people find it helpful. With clicker training, you can easily and effectively teach your dog all kinds of basic and advanced commands and tricks. It's fast and easy to learn how to clicker train your dog 06 of 09 Basic Commands and Fun Tricks Dog Trick Photo - Train Your Dog to Roll Over Photo © BobMacInnes on flickr There are some basic dog training commands and dog tricks that every dog should know. Basic commands give your dog structure. In addition, they can help you overcome common dog behavior problems and will help keep your dog safe.

What's more fun than showing off your dog's cool tricks?! Dog tricks are a great way to take your dog training to the next level and give your dog some mental stimulation. 07 of 09 Proofing Behaviors and Troubleshooting Well-Behaved Dog Photo - Canine Good Citizen Photo © iStockphoto.com/Lios Proofing is the last step in training your dog to do any new behavior. Learn how to proof behaviors so your dog will be as obedient at the park or a friend's house is he is in your own living room. Remember, just because you have reached the final stages of training, it doesn't mean that behavior problems won't crop up. Learn about the most common dog behavior problems and how to deal with them. These guides will help you navigate this part of the training process:
Proofing Behaviors: Practice behaviors in a variety of situations with different levels of distraction.

 Without proofing, your dog may behave well in your living room, but seem to forget all his training when he is outside the house. Teach Your Dog Self-Control: This method teaches your dog that nothing in life is free, but that he needs to earn things like food and attention through obedience. Common Dog Behavior Problems: Understanding potential behavior issues can help you detect and address them before things get out of control. Dog Behavior Management Versus Dog Training: While dog behavior management and dog training are two different things, they are not mutually exclusive. Behavior management is an important part of any dog training program. 08 of 09 Training Specific Types of Dogs Labrador Retriever Looking at Yorkshire Terrier - Dog Breed Contrasts Photo © Compassionate Eye Foundation/Martin Barraud/OJO Images Ltd/Getty Images No two dogs are exactly the same. Many dogs learn differently based on breed, size, age, and history. Find out how to customize your training methods and style to get the best results. Continue to 9 of 9 below. 09 of 09 Going the Extra Mile: Advanced Dog Training border collie disc dog photo Photo © Barbara Giacobe Once your dog has mastered all the basics,

You can consider moving on to a more advanced level. These activities will help keep your dog active, fit and mentally stimulated. Plus, they will help strengthen the bond you share with your canine companion. Remember that training is an ongoing process. You will never be completely finished. It is important to keep working on obedience training throughout the life of your dog. People who learn a language at a young age but stop speaking that language may forget much of it as they grow older. The same goes for your dog: use it or lose it. Running through even the most basic tricks and commands will help them stay fresh in your dog's mind. Plus, it's a great way to spend time with your dog.

How can I training my dog

Are you interested in adding a new dog to your life? Would you like your current dog to be better behaved? Would you like to train your dog to serve your needs instead of being trained to serve its needs? Attending dog classes led by a professional trainer is the best approach, but not everyone can afford classes. These tips are a good start to training your canine companion. There are many philosophies and approaches to dog training, so do your research and learn what works for you and your dog.[1] Regardless on which approach to training your dog you take, building a good relationship with your dog is essential to being able to train effectively.

5 essential commands you can teach your dog

Having a trained dog isn’t the same as having a balanced dog, but if your dog knows a few basic commands, it can be helpful when tackling problem behaviors — existing ones or those that may develop in the future.
So where do you start with dog obedience training? You could take a class, but it’s not necessary; you can do it yourself. In fact, with the right attitude, it can be fun for both you and your dog!
Related: 6 steps to teaching your dog to fetch
Sit
This is one of the easiest dog obedience commands to teach, so it’s a good one to start with.
  • Hold a treat close to your dog’s nose.
  • Move your hand up, allowing his head to follow the treat and causing his bottom to lower.
  • Once he’s in sitting position, say “Sit,” give him the treat, and share affection.
Repeat this sequence a few times every day until your dog has it mastered. Then ask your dog to sit before mealtime, when leaving for walks, and during other situations where you’d like him calm and seated.
Come
This command can help keep a dog out of trouble, bringing him back to you if you lose grip on the leash or accidentally leave the front door open.
  • Put a leash and collar on your dog.
  • Go down to his level and say, “Come,” while gently pulling on the leash.
  • When he gets to you, reward him with affection and a treat.
Once he’s mastered it with the leash, remove it — and practice the command in a safe, enclosed area.
Down
This can be one of the more difficult commands in dog obedience training. Why? Because the position is a submissive posture. You can help by keeping training positive and relaxed, particularly with fearful or anxious dogs.
  • Find a particularly good smelling treat, and hold it in your closed fist.
  • Hold your hand up to your dog’s snout. When he sniffs it, move your hand to the floor, so he follows.
  • Then slide your hand along the ground in front of him to encourage his body to follow his head.
  • Once he’s in the down position, say “Down,” give him the treat, and share affection.
Repeat it every day. If your dog tries to sit up or lunges toward your hand, say “No” and take your hand away. Don’t push him into a down position, and encourage every step your dog takes toward the right position. After all, he’s working hard to figure it out!
Stay
Before attempting this one, make sure your dog is an expert at the “Sit” command.
  • First, ask your dog to “Sit.”
  • Then open the palm of your hand in front of you, and say “Stay.”
  • Take a few steps back. Reward him with a treat and affection if he stays.
  • Gradually increase the number of steps you take before giving the treat.
  • Always reward your pup for staying put — even if it’s just for a few seconds.
This is an exercise in self-control for your dog, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a while to master, particularly for puppies and high-energy dogs. After all, they want to be on the move and not just sitting there waiting.
Leave it
This can help keep your dog safe when his curiosity gets the better of him, like if he smells something intriguing but possibly dangerous on the ground! The goal is to teach your pup that he gets something even better for ignoring the other item.
  • Place a treat in both hands.
  • Show him one enclosed fist with the treat inside, and say, “Leave it.”
  • Let him lick, sniff, mouth, paw, and bark to try to get it — and ignore the behaviors.
  • Once he stops trying, give him the treat from the other hand.
  • Repeat until your dog moves away from that first fist when you say, “Leave it.”
  • Next, only give your dog the treat when he moves away from that first fist and also looks up at you.
Once your dog consistently moves away from the first treat and gives you eye contact when you say the command, you’re ready to take it up a notch. For this, use two different treats — one that’s just all right and one that’s a particularly good smelling and tasty favorite for your pup.
  • Say “Leave it,” place the less attractive treat on the floor, and cover it with your hand.
  • Wait until your dog ignores that treat and looks at you. Then remove that treat from the floor, give him the better treat and share affection immediately.
  • Once he’s got it, place the less tasty treat on the floor… but don’t completely cover it with your hand. Instead hold it a little bit above the treat. Over time, gradually move your hand farther and farther away until your hand is about 6 inches above.
  • Now he’s ready to practice with you standing up! Follow the same steps, but if he tries to snatch the less tasty treat, cover it with your foot.
Don’t rush the process. Remember, you’re asking a lot of your dog. If you take it up a notch and he’s really struggling, go back to the previous stage.
Just these five simple commands can help keep your dog safer and improve your communication with him. It’s well worth the investment of your time and effort. Remember, the process takes time, so only start a dog obedience training session if you’re in the right mindset to practice calm-assertive energy and patience.